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Yuktepat Human Body Part Radicals by conciliarityoftepat Yuktepat Human Body Part Radicals by conciliarityoftepat

The basic vector forms are done for the basic glyphs (radicals) representing human body parts. As radicals, they combine with other glyphs to form new glyphs, vastly enlarging the range of words that can be written in Yuktepat.

Traditionally radicals are organized into groups by semantics. Within the “body” category, parts are listed from the top of the body to the bottom, with internal organs following the external ones.

Several body parts also function as verbs with no marking. Two different glyphs for “foot” exist, which occur inside different compound glyphs - largely depending on which one fits better.

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:iconviorp:
Viorp Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2016
Awesome very mayan. And all things look like wwhat they represent.
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2016
Thanks. Mayan wasn't the direct inspiration for it, but it has turned out like it in some ways.
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:iconlyhoko:
Lyhoko Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016  Hobbyist
Looks nice!

Somewhat interesting: The word for eye/see in Ancaron used to be "puc" [puk] though I recently changed it after going through the words I had come up with and putting them into an easy to use dictionary, there were too many body part words beginning with "p".
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2016

Thanks. You might also try turning the p- into some sort of prefix, or class marker for body parts.

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:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Most intriguing...I am curious, mind, about the two different words for arm. Are they referring to different parts that the same glyph covers, a human versus nonhuman limb, a stationary limb versus a limb in use, a functioning versus severed arm, or just two separate words used depending on some other context?
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016
Having created the "arm" glyph, I checked my dictionary and found I have two words for arm already. Sin is "forearm" and theng is "upper arm." The glyph evolved from a picture of the entire arm (including the hand), so it wasn't a better fit for either word. Now I use diacritic marks on different sides of the glyph to distinguish the two readings.

I don't distinguish stationary / moving or functioning / severed limbs in Yuktepat, and actually hadn't even thought of it. There is another word for an animal limb, although I haven't decided it yet. One feature of Yuktepat's lexicon is that it uses different words for many human and non-human body parts, even more so than English - for example, different words for a human head (khal) and an animal head (sûq). Eventually there will be an "animal parts" category of radicals.
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:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Wise idea...and the fact that it's only one glyph makes for interesting parallels in the future. Out of curiosity, though, how many words do you have?
(Chuckle) Being honest, I hadn't thought of it either for my own work. I do some of my best thinking when annoying people, I'm sorry to say. But it could be interesting, having separate categories for animal and human body parts. It'll be useful in slang, for one, especially if the roots are varied enough.
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016
993! (Not all with a written form though)

Indeed, it's useful already. I figure using animal words in reference to people is insulting. Swel "tail" is used roughly the same as "arsehole" in English. I'm sure there are many other possibilities.
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:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Impressive! Even my most developed language only has about 400. I seriously need to stop using such a convoluted generation system...
I can imagine! But those I leave to you. Good luck, and keep making more of these!
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2016
Increasingly, I think the total number of words isn't a big deal. If you can use your grammar to make a lot of a few root words, that may be better than having a lot of standalone words. Do you post your conlangs somewhere?
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:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
On a Google document at the moment, but do you think I should start here? I've been posting nowt for ages.
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2016
Might as well. I've never seen any of your conlangs, and since this is DA, your gallery is probably the first place people would think to look for it.

The only problem I could see with conlanging on DA is not knowing what category to file it under.
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(1 Reply)
:icontonio103:
Tonio103 Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Beautiful as always, I particularly love the 'xhat'/tooth/eat character :)

I have two question though : have you written anywhere the way we need to pronounce the romanization ?
And why exactly those two foot glyphs exist ? Have they a different origin ? Does their utilisation change only for graphic reason or is there a semantic one ?
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016
I keep remembering, and then forgetting, to describe the phonology and transcription of Yuktepat. It's pretty simple though. H after a letter marks an aspirated consonant - EXCEPT for xh, which is used to spell a uvular fricative [χ]. I used to use a diacritic on the X, but it was easier to forget and harder to typeset :/

Circumflexes mark unrounded back or central vowels, so:
ô = [ʌ~ǝ]
û = [ɯ~ɨ]

And y is [j], just because I like y better than j.

The two "foot" glyphs have different origins. The first one originated from a picture of the bottom of a foot. The second one originated from a picture of the side of a foot. I don't use them differently. The choice depends mainly on which one I think fits better with other glyphs. So, graphic reason right now at least.
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:icontonio103:
Tonio103 Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Okay, I think you should do a quick note or journal entry to write that down ^^
I think you're right to use 'y' instead of 'j' over your personal preferences, 'y' is very fitting for an asiatic inspired language while j is more fitting for northern/eastern european inspired conlangs in my opinion :)

Mmh okay, I think you really should try to find a reason for having created those two graphic variations ^^ it will only put more substance to your conlanging :)
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016
Maybe to keep things organized, but I don't think it's too important. Chinese still has several different-looking "hand" characters. Aside from the standalone 手 "hand," 又, 爪, and 爫 originated from pictures of hands, and appear in different characters by convention. Redundant overkill is common in languages :)
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:icontonio103:
Tonio103 Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Ah ok, so you already find a reason :) when the writing system was really pictographic, the people drew multiple versions of some pictograms cause it was easy to recognize so making it uniform was not necessary then ?
I know those kind of thing even happen in oral. In the gallo-roman dialect of my region, they use indifferently multiple vowels for the same word without bothering them. For example, for "i loved" they could say : /a'ma.vo/, /a'ma.vɔ/, /a'ma.və/,/a'ma.vɔ̃/ or /a'ma.vɒ̃/ without bothering them in the comprehension. It's the result of never having a standardization and schools to learn them exactly how to speak ^^ 
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2016
Mostly with Tepatic glyphs I drew little pictures over and over until they morphed into something more abstract. A lot of the time I came up with multiple simplifications that I had to prune. But it works out. Tepat's writing system evolved most rapidly when the country was in a period of civil war. I can just pretend that the variants were from this period. After Tepat was reunified, the victorious government standardized the writing system. But languages aren't always standardized in the most logical way (look at English), so a few inconsistencies shouldn't be a problem.
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:icontonio103:
Tonio103 Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, languages have such very cool irregular (but explainable) features ^^
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:iconjohnraptor:
JohnRaptor Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2016   General Artist
I like that it looks like they have pictographic origins but have been partially abstracted. Very believable.
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016
Thanks, that was what I was going for. I should add the original pictographs sometime.
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:iconad-referendum:
ad-referendum Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
... awesome!
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:iconconciliarityoftepat:
conciliarityoftepat Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016
Thanks
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:iconad-referendum:
ad-referendum Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
=^.^=
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